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Adult Spiritual Enrichment Registration

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If you have any trouble registering, please email your name and enrollment requests to .

Class Listing

Cancellation: If you find that you must cancel your registration, please let us know so that we can make your space available to someone else. If the class is cancelled for any reason, the class leader/facilitator will notify you. In case of bad weather, we will cancel classes if Frederick County schools are closed or dismissed early. Check the UUCF message by calling the office at (301) 473-7680, or contact the class leader/facilitator directly.

Fees/Donations: For those who are able, a small suggested donation is indicated for some offerings. Remuneration, if any, to professional and outside presenters is included in the suggested donation. Books and materials are usually the responsibility of participants.

To suggest a class or workshop or adult education activity, please see How To Propose Future Courses.

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What are Dreams?

Rev. Rebecca Hill
Thursday, March 8, 2018; 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. (76a)

Description: In this class, we will view the PBS NOVA Special: "What are Dreams?" - a fascinating investigation of sleep research around the world and the many possible uses of dreaming. Ample time will be allowed for group discussion. How does the content of this film impact us on a personal level? No experience in dream work is needed to appreciate this groundbreaking work.

Cost: $25

Please register at: Sacred.Dreamwork@gmail.com

Rev. Rebecca Hill, RN, MS is an Ordained Interfaith Minister and a hospice/palliative care NP. She has trained at CG Jung Centers in the US and in Zurich, Switzerland, and has extensive experience in dream work facilitation.

Conflict Resolution Workshop

Alternatives to Violence
Friday, March 9 thru Sunday, March 11, 2018 (77a)

Conflict Resolution Weekend Workshop at UUCF: Rescheduled to Friday, March 9 – Sunday, March 11. Facilitated by Alternatives to Violence facilitators, this weekend intensive workshop will help participants: • Learn tools for resolving everyday conflicts, • Avoid the added pain of expressing angry words that go beyond the issue at hand and further wound others and ourselves. • Practice a method for expressing our heartfelt needs and wants, find common ground, and move forward from seemingly incompatible points of view.

Registration is open now and only 5 spaces remain. Fee of $50 will cover the facilitators as well as meals throughout the weekend. For more details and to register, visit: Conflict Resolution.

Rewriting Your Story: A Workshop for Changing Your Past, Present, and Future

Julia Jones
Saturday, March 10, 2018 10:00 a.m. (90 minutes) (71a)

This class allows participants to choose one event from their past that creates suffering for them and re-cast the event in order to release past pain and prevent the event from continuing to limit the participant in the present and the future. Methods used for teaching participants to rewrite their story are based on cognitive behavioral therapy, conscious empathy, and the development of self-compassion.

Through a recasting of the past event, participants will discover how many of their own facts were based on feeling and judgment, will consider alternate motives and explanations for people involved in the event (including themselves), and will access long-term positive growth that comes from even the worst life circumstances.

During the class participants will be asked to write their story as they currently tell it to themselves. The instructor will then lead participants through a sorting exercise where fact and feeling are made distinct. Participants will be reminded that their feelings are theirs and should be honored, but it is possible that a re-examination of the facts and the thoughts we have about them might allow for different feelings. The instructor will lead participants through examining their thoughts about their story and analyzing how those thoughts impact their feelings. The instructor will lead participants to consider new thoughts about the story that are accurate or believable but create less suffering.

The group will consider motives, explanations and other details that can often be more broadly understood and interpreted as we gain experience through aging. Participants will be asked to explore how they feel about themselves in the situation from the past. The instructor will lead participants through exercises designed to release old hurts and provide relief and forgiveness to younger versions of themselves. Participants will then write a new version of their story that acknowledges their current and past strengths and that relieves or at least diminishes suffering from the past event. I am a Martha Beck Trained and BARE Certified Life Coach. I am also a writer. No fee. No childcare. My phone: 301-717-850.

Meditation in Everyday Life

Dr. Jerry Webster
Mondays, March 26 thru April 9 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. (740)

One often hears that one enters a meditation course to learn to relax. Although relaxing is often one of the byproducts of Buddhist meditation, the true purpose is to be more fully present in one’s life, being present on the spot rather than being riveted about according to one’s hopes and fears. It is about being open to whatever arises in one’s life. So one could say that a goal of meditation is to be present to whatever comes up in one’s life. It is only by living in the present that one can truly live one’s life.

Meditation is making friends with oneself and developing compassion towards others. We can learn to develop friendship with our mind, skill in how to work with speed and difficulty, and a sense of humor. The journey continues by slowly allowing that mind to relax within itself. We let go of struggling with ourselves. We train in being awake in the present moment.

As human beings, our minds are naturally open, aware, fresh and good. Even though we experience agitation, difficult emotions, stress, anxiety, and anger, beneath and within all of these experiences, we can contact a state of being that is fresh and clear. Meditation is the practice to discover and rest in this uncluttered and open state of mind. Meditation is a simple practice, available to all human beings, which enables us to discover and rest in the natural peace and goodness of this world.

This is a program on bringing mindfulness into our daily lives. It is not about becoming a Buddhist but searching into the very techniques which Gotama Buddha employed over 3,000 years ago. Well, it worked for him, and it has worked for many people since him in a variety of spiritual traditions. This is not a religious course, but it is about working with techniques that will allow one to enter one’s life more fully through the benefits of a mindfulness practice.

This program is open to both new and long-time meditation practitioners. It will allow participants to begin a new practice or to deepen one if one has already established a practice.

Meditation practice between classes is highly encouraged. It is an easy practice — just being — but as in any practice, one has to practice to learn what one is doing. This course follows the teachings and meditation techniques of Shambhala Buddhism.

Course Schedule

Week 1: Meditation: An Intimate Relationship with Ourselves

Week 2: Gathering the Mind and Working with Emotions

Week 3: Everyday Life and Enlightened Society

As support for this course, participants may want to purchase the book Mindfulness in Action: Making Friends with Yourself Through Meditation and Everyday Awareness by Chogyam Trungpa, Shambhala Publications.

Cost: $60 for all three classes (shared with UUCF)

Your Instructor

Jerry Webster presently serves as the Shastri, or head teacher, with the Shambhala Buddhist Meditation Center in Washington, D.C. He began meditation with a ten-day retreat in India with the Burmese teacher Goenka in 1974. Since 1976, he has been a student of the Shambhala Buddhist tradition, and he has taught in this tradition since 1977. He obtained his Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Maryland. He has taught numerous courses in literature for the University of Maryland and numerous courses in multiculturalism for Montgomery County Public Schools. He has taught English full-time in public school systems for forty years, beginning with the Peace Corps in Afghanistan in 1973. During the past few years, he has led four full-day, week-long meditation weekthuns along with numerous programs at Shambhala Centers along the East Coast. Recently he has also led multiple programs at Johns Hopkins University, the U.S. Peace Corps, Frederick Community College, and the Frederick Meditation Center.

UUCF 101: Pathways to Membership

Membership Committee
Saturday, Saturday, April 7, 9:00 am (51a)

Are you considering membership at UUCF? Join the Membership Committee for a half-day intensive exploration of Unitarian Universalist history and principles, specific information about our own congregation, and discussion of our individual spiritual journeys. Participants will receive a free copy of the UUA booklet Welcome: A Unitarian Universalist Primer. Light refreshments will be provided.

Childcare can be provided with one-week's notice to DRE Lora Powell-Haney at .

Contentment in Everyday Life

Jerry Webster, Ph.D.
Tuesdays, June 5 - 26, 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm (75a)

The fruition of contentment is a genuine, humble, simple sense of confidence and trust. This is a genuine sense of self-respect. Because there is a sense of friendliness toward our self, we are able to rest in our experience in the present. Because we can be now, we can appreciate our self and our world. With this gentle, present, appreciation, we can meet suffering without adding further aggression to the situation. We can learn a sense of humble curiosity about moment-to-moment experience.

Based upon this training in contentment in everyday life, we may have a glimpse of trusting our self. This is not just a fantasy or a hope. We can actually experience, in a basic and genuine way, that we can work with ourselves and our emotions. In this way, we can trust in our self as we are, not as we think we should be. Therefore, we experience confidence. We do not have to be afraid of who we are.

One often hears that one enters a meditation course to learn to relax, to be content. Although relaxing is often one of the byproducts of Buddhist meditation, the true purpose is to be more fully present in one’s life, being present on the spot rather than being riveted about according to one’s hopes and fears. It is about being open to whatever arises in one’s life. It is only by living in the present that one can truly live one’s life and be content with one’s life.

Meditation is making friends with oneself and developing compassion towards others. We can learn to develop friendship with our mind, skill in how to work with speed and difficulty, and a sense of humor. The journey continues by slowly allowing that mind to relax within itself. We let go of struggling with ourselves. We train in being awake in the present moment.

As human beings, our minds are naturally open, aware, fresh and good. Even though we experience agitation, difficult emotions, stress, anxiety, and anger, beneath and within all of these experiences, we can contact a state of being that is fresh and clear. Meditation is the practice to discover and rest in this uncluttered and open state of mind. Meditation is a simple practice, available to all human beings, which enables us to discover and rest in the natural peace and goodness of this world.

This is a program on finding contentment in our daily lives. It is not about becoming a Buddhist but searching into the very techniques which Gotama Buddha employed over 3,000 years ago. Well, it worked for him, and it has worked for many people since him in a variety of spiritual traditions. This is not a religious course, but it is about working with techniques that will allow one to enter one’s life more fully through the benefits of a mindfulness practice.

This program is open to both new and long-time meditation practitioners. It will allow participants to begin a new practice or to deepen one if one has already established a practice.

Meditation practice between classes is highly encouraged. It is an easy practice — just being — but as in any practice, one has to practice to learn what one is doing.

Course Schedule

Week 1: Introducing Contentment: Friendly to Ourselves

Week 2: Contemplating Contentment: Nowness

Week 3: Suffering and the Four Noble Truths: Meeting Suffering with Gentleness

Week 4: Working with Emotions and the Confidence of Contentment

As support for this court, participants may want to purchase the book Mindfulness in Action: Making Friends with Yourself Through Meditation and Everyday Awareness by Chogyam Trungpa, Shambhala Publications, which will be on sale at the Curious Iguana at a 20% discount before the course begins.

Cost: $80 (for all 4 sessions) (shared with UUCF)

Your Instructor

Jerry Webster presently serves as the Shastri, or head teacher, with the Shambhala Buddhist Meditation Center in Washington, D.C. He began meditation with a ten-day retreat in India with the Burmese teacher Goenka in 1974. Since 1976, he is a student of the Shambhala Buddhist tradition, and he has taught in this tradition since 1977. He obtained his Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Maryland. He has taught numerous courses in literature for the University of Maryland and numerous courses in multiculturalism for Montgomery County Public Schools. He has taught English full-time in public school systems for forty years, beginning with the Peace Corps in Afghanistan in 1973. During the past few years, he has led four full-day, week-long meditation weekthuns and numerous programs at Shambhala Buddhist Centers along the East Coast. Recently, he has taught multiple programs for Johns Hopkins University, the U.S. Peace Corps, Frederick Community College, and the Frederick Meditation Center.

Feldenkrais at UUCF

Katie Giarth (www.bodyinmotion.com)
Thursdays, 5:30 pm (Chapel) beginning January 7th (70a)

Feldenkrais at UUCF: 5:30 p.m. (Chapel). Join UUCF member, Katie Giarth. Feldenkrais employs guided attention and gentle movement with an emphasis on sensory learning. Improves posture, flexibility, coordination, athletic performance, mobility, chronic pain, tension and stress. $10/session or $80 for all 10 sessions Visit: http://www.brainbodymotion.com/ for more information about Katie and Feldenkrais.

Yoga for Beginners

Irene Glasse
Tuesdays, 10:00 am in the Chapel (10a)

Feeling stressed? Try yoga! Yoga for Beginners offers an accessible pace of basic yoga poses appropriate for beginners or anyone looking for a focused, mindful yoga practice.

Feel free to contact Irene with any questions at

Suggested Donation to UUCF: $5 per session
 


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